Where has all the cornflour gone?

Where has all the cornflour gone? Cooks left outraged as staple disappears from supermarket shelves amid ‘low demand’ – but supply issues could be to blame

  •  The staple used to thicken soups and sauces has been removed from shelves 
  • Tesco said they had taken the item out of stores due to ‘low demand’ 
  • People have gone online complain about the lack of cornflour in shops 

Cornflour, an inexpensive cupboard staple, is disappearing from supermarket, and customers aren’t happy. 

The flavorless flour is used as a thickener and is also a popular choice when looking to add crispiness to meat dishes such as fried chicken. 

However, customers are reporting there none available in supermarkets such as Tesco, and the retailer sparked panic in a response to a query on Twitter, saying: ‘We’ve removed cornflour due to low customer demand I’m afraid.’ 

It’s since been clarified that Tesco is intending to restock the product and that it’s working with to increase availability, and it appears that supply issues could be to blame for the shortage. 

Cornflour is made using corn kernels, and the ongoing war in Ukraine has led to a shortage of both wheat and corn, Ukraine alone accounts for 13 per cent of the global corn production. 

The flavorless flour is used as a thickener and is also a popular choice when looking to add crispiness to meat dishes such as fried chicken.

Tesco revealed they have discontinued the product and said in response to a customer query: ‘We’ve removed cornflour due to low customer demand I’m afriad.’

Responding to the suggestion that cornflour isn’t popular with shoppers, one Twitter user wrote: ‘I cannot imagine there is no customer demand for cornflour! It is a staple thickening agent for sauces, gravy, casseroles, stews, soup and custard.’ 

Others have echoed the same sentiment, with some saying they had been ‘searching everywhere’ for the thickening agent, which would come in handy for making homemade gravy for Christmas. 

Uk parenting site Mumsnet started a thread about the lack of cornflour in shops, many users deeming the starch an essential household item.

A Twitter user said: ”I cannot imagine there is no customer demand for cornflour! It is a staple thickening agent for sauces, gravy, casseroles, stews, soup and custard.’

One wrote: ‘What a coincidence I had to ask a member of staff in Tesco on the weekend where the cornflour was.

‘She looked at the app thing and said that cornflour would not register. I guess it is off to Sainsbury’s then this week.’

Many are outraged, saying: ‘Surely loads of people buy cornflour. That’s annoying.’

Another commented: ‘Ocado never seem to have it in stock anymore either. I use it quite a lot as we use it in cookies etc. 

Cornflour is made using corn kernels, and the ongoing war in Ukraine has led to a shortage of both wheat and corn, but shoppers are not happy about the short supply of the cooking staple 

‘Massive pain not being able to buy it anywhere anymore.’

One user held out hope, and said: ‘They often do this with popular products but they end up bringing it back some time later in different packaging, or lower weight most likely.’ 

Cornflour is made using corn kernels, and the ongoing war in Ukraine has led to a shortage of both wheat and corn, Ukraine alone accounts for 13 per cent of the global corn production. 

It has not been confirmed whether the war has had an effect on the supply chain but according to euro news corn is another staple food item commonly grown in both Ukraine and Russia. 

As the fourth and fifth largest exporters, together they make up around a fifth of the total exports of this crop. This year Ukraine was expected to grow its largest ever crop of corn. 

It comes as customers are also facing egg rationing amid bird flu and soaring production costs.

Asda has started limiting customers to two boxes while Lidl has imposed a three-box rule in some stores.

Wetherspoon has even removed eggs from fry-ups in a number of its pubs.

Poultry farmers are facing their largest-ever outbreak of bird flu with cases escalating rapidly. At the same time some producers have given up, complaining that supermarket prices do not reflect the soaring costs of feed and energy.

Figures published by the Office for National Statistics this week showed annual food inflation hit 16.2 per cent in October, the highest level since 1977. The figure for a dozen eggs was up 35.3 per cent to £2.91.

The British Free Range Egg Producers Association said higher costs and grain supply issues since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine were hurting the industry.

Source: Read Full Article