Judy Garland age: How old would Judy Garland be if she were alive?

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Judy Garland was thrust into the limelight as a young child, working in movies as a teenager and even gaining a contract with mega-studio MGM. This time was difficult for Judy, causing long-lasting struggles which continued until her adulthood. She had three children and died in 1969 in London.

How old would Judy Garland be if she were alive?

Judy Garland was just 47-years-old at the time of her death on June 22, 1969.

She was born on June 10, 1922, which would make her 99-years-old today if she were still alive.

Judi was born as Frances Gumm in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, and was the youngest child of vaudevillian parents.

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They ran a movie theatre in the area, but soon her parents noticed her amazing performance skills when she took to the stage at her family theatre, and she began performing with her sisters in a new act, The Gumm Sisters.

They relocated to Lancaster, California, where her father ran another theatre while Ethel, Judy’s mother, began managing her and her sisters.

While she and her sisters performed, she took the name Judy Garland, and they worked as the Garland sisters for some time before Judy got her own contract with MGM in 1935, aged just 13-years-old.

From there, she starred in a huge amount of films, but she claimed she was given drugs to keep her up and awake as well as sleeping pills to help her sleep, which developed a dependency later in life, though some of her co-stars disputed this.

According to Gerald Clarke’s biography, Get Happy: The Life of Judy Garland, she said she was approached by men for sex, and that Louis B Mayer would put his hand on her breast after complimenting how her singing “came from the heart.”

She is reported to have said: “I often thought I was lucky that I didn’t sing with another part of my anatomy.”

Judy also alleged she told him to stop, at which she claims he cried and professed his love for her.

Judy also claimed she was made to feel ugly and hounded to lose weight by executives, and suffered a great deal of criticism over her looks, which added to her mental health struggles throughout her life.

She continued to work for much of her 20s and 30s, and while her popularity waned at different times of her life, by the time of her death she was having an on-stage comeback, having had her own CBS TV show in the early 1960s.

She was in financial trouble at this time and signed on to do a number of performances at the Talk of the Town club, now the London Hippodrome, to help pay her way.

However, her health was in decline and was also having marital problems.

According to the coroner, Judy died of an accidental overdose of barbiturates on June 22, 1969, saying no evidence suggested she had died by suicide.

Her funeral took place not long later, with the New York Times reporting that actor James Mason said during her eulogy: “Judy’s great gift was that she could wring tears out of hearts of rock.”

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