Alec Baldwin is 'REFUSING' to hand over his phone to cops in wake of Rust film shooting, police say

ALEC Baldwin is refusing to hand over his phone to cops following the Rust film shooting, police say.

The Santa Fe County Sheriff's Office secured a search warrant back on December 16 for Baldwin's cell phone and its contents.



According to a news release issued by the Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office, Baldwin's attorney acknowledged receipt of the warrant, however, Baldwin "had not immediately provided his phone pursuant to the initial search," which lead cops to ask for help from the District Attorney's Office.

"On December 20, 2021, the Santa Fe County Sheriff's Office was advised that the Santa Fe District Attorney was in negotiations with Mr. Baldwin's attorney to obtain consent to retrieve the phone and its contents," the sheriff's office said in a statement.

"To date, the cell phone has not been turned over to authorities."

Crew member Halyna Hutchins, 42, died from her injuries while director Joel Souza fought for his life after a prop gun misfired.

Baldwin was quizzed by cops following the accident and was snapped sobbing outside a local police station in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

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Alec was filming a scene on the set of his new Western movie, Rust, that required him to fire a gun that was supposed to be loaded with blanks.

However, tragedy struck when the gun discharged either shrapnel or a bullet, which hit two people on set including the director of photography, Halyna Hutchins.

Shortly after the incident took place, Halyna was airlifted to a hospital where she died from her injuries.

Joel Souza, who was also shot, was taken to hospital. He was treated and released later that evening.

Earlier that day, a half-dozen camera crew walked off the set to protest the working conditions, the LA Times revealed.

A crew member also told the outlet that Hutchins had been advocating for safer conditions for her team.

The shooting at Bonanza Creek Ranch just outside of Santa Fe, New Mexico happened in the middle of a scene that was either being rehearsed or filmed – with the incident potentially being caught on camera, officials confirmed.

The TV and film star was "unaware" about the type of ammunition in the gun, according to Deadline. 

However, an email from the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees (IATSE) Local 44 confirmed that the prop contained a "live round" of ammunition.

"A live single round was accidentally fired on set by the principal actor, hitting both the Director of Photography, Local 600 member Halyna Hutchins, and Director Joel Souza," the email said, according to Insider.

"Local 44 has confirmed that the Props, Set Decoration, Special Effects, and Construction Departments were staffed by New Mexico crew members. There were no Local 44 members on the call sheet."

MORE LAWSUITS ARISE

A new lawsuit accused an ammunition supplier of creating dangerous conditions on a movie set where a gun held by actor Alec Baldwin killed a cinematographer, by including live ammunition in a box that was supposed to include only dummy rounds.

The lawsuit was filed in New Mexico state district court by Hannah Gutierrez Reed, the armorer who oversaw firearms, ammunition and related training on the set of “Rust” along with two colleagues.

Cinematographer Halyna Hutchins died on Oct. 21 from a gunshot wound during a “Rust” rehearsal at a ranch on the outskirts of Santa Fe in northern New Mexico.

The Santa Fe County Sheriff’s Office that is leading an investigation into the cause of the death has said it is too soon to determine whether charges will be filed.

Investigators have described “some complacency” in how weapons were handled on set.

The lawsuit from Gutierrez Reed places blame on ammunition supplier Seth Kenney and his company PDQ Arm & Prop for introducing live rounds to the set where only blanks and dummies were supposed to be present.

“The introduction of live rounds onto the set, which no one anticipated, combined with the rushed and chaotic atmosphere, created a perfect storm for a safety incident,” the lawsuit states.

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